Climate change risks finally grab Australia’s attention

Sailosi Ramatu looks over the sea at his old village Vunidogoloa in Fiji. Each time the ocean surged through their coastal Fijian village, residents would use rafts to move from house to house. Photo: APWhen Cyclone Evan slammed into Samoa five years ago next week, it triggered the near-complete loss of power and water supplies in the capital, Apia, and forced villagers to relocate to schools and the university for months.
Nanjing Night Net

The category-4 tempest was the strongest to hit the Pacific nation in a couple of decades. For Samoan Brianna Fruean, one of the Pacific Climate Warriors, it was another sign – along with rising sea levels, and more intense floods and droughts – that action needed to be taken.

“Climate change is happening right in front of our eyes,” Fruean said this week on the sidelines of a meeting in Fiji of Civicus, a global civil society group.

Helen Clark – the former New Zealand prime minister and an ex-senior United Nations official – was also at the Suva gathering. Clark says she is not surprised by its central topic.

“You can’t come to a meeting in the Pacific and not have climate change as the focus,” Clark tells Fairfax Media. “Everybody talks about it because it’s an existential threat to the Pacific.”

Samoa at least has high ground where people can seek refuge. Tuvalu, Kiribati and the Marshall Islands are nations barely three metrestoper centhonouring,per centdecarbonisecloserageingper centMrper centper centper centageing,realisingstrategisegovernmentup on,DefenceandcentrecharacterisationThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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