Economy: Do you want the good news or bad news first?

Executive office staff and catering at the big end of town. generic workers, employment, employees, jobs, business man, business woman, suits. Monday 8th December 2008 AFR photo Louie Douvis AFR USE ONLY SPECIAL 97246Scott Morrison is right. We’re experiencing “solid” growth in the economy – provided you remember that word is econocrats’ code for “not bad – but not great”.
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This week’s national accounts from the Australian Bureau of Statistics show real gross domestic product grew by 0.6 per cent in the September quarter. Taking the figures literally, this meant the economy grew by 2.8 per cent over the year to September, way up on the 1.9 per cent by which it grew over the year to June.

But it’s often a mistake to take the quarterly national accounts – the first draft of history, so to speak – too literally.

As Dr Shane Oliver, of AMP Capital, reminds us, the annual growth figure is artificially strong because the contraction of 0.3 per cent in the September quarter of last year dropped out of the annual calculation, whereas the 0.9 per cent bounce back in following quarter stayed in.

The bureau’s trend (smoothed seasonally adjusted) estimates show growth of 2.4 per cent over the year to September, which is probably closer to the truth.

That compares with the economy’s “potential” (maximum average rate of growth over the medium term, without rising inflation pressure) of 2.75 per cent a year. And with the Reserve Bank’s forecast that growth over next calendar year will reach 3 per cent.

Since growth has fallen short of its potential rate for so long – creating plenty of spare production capacity – the economy can (and often does) grow faster than its medium-term “speed limit” for a few years without overheating.

And, although the latest reading isn’t all that wonderful, there are enough good signs among the bad to leave intact the Reserve’s forecast of better times next year.

(Remember, however, that much of the growth in all the figures I’ve quoted – and will go on to quote – comes from a simple, but often unacknowledged, source: growth in the population. The bureau’s trend estimates show real GDP per person of just 0.3 per cent during the quarter and just 0.9 per cent over the year.)

Getting the detail, we’ll start with the bad news. Consumer spending – which accounts for well over half of GDP – grew by a minuscule 0.1 per cent during the quarter, and by a weak 2.2 per cent over the year to September.

Why? Because, despite remarkably strong growth in the number of people earning incomes from jobs, the increase in people’s wages is unusually low – as measured by the national accounts, even lower than the 2 per cent registered by the wage price index.

Until now, households have been cutting their rate of saving so as to keep their consumption spending growing faster than their disposable (after-tax) income. They’ve probably been encouraged in this by the knowledge that the value of their homes has been rising rapidly, thus making them feel wealthier.

Now, however, Melbourne house prices are rising more moderately, while Sydney prices are falling a little. Price rises in other state capitals have long been more modest.

In the latest quarter, households’ income rose faster than their consumption spending, meaning they increased their rate of saving. It’s possible people have become more conscious of our record level of household (mainly housing) debt – though this is probably taking the (particularly dodgy) quarter-to-quarter changes too literally.

Next bit of bad news is that the boom in home building has finally topped out, with activity falling by 1 per cent in the quarter and by 2.3 per cent over the year.

There are a lot of already-approved apartments yet to be built, however. So, though home building’s addition to growth has finished, it’s future subtraction from growth shouldn’t be great.

Which brings us to the first bit of good news. While investment in new housing has peaked, business investment in equipment and structures in the (huge) non-mining part of the economy is finally getting up steam.

According to estimates from Felicity Emmett, of ANZ bank, non-mining business investment rose by 2.7 per cent in the quarter, and by 14 per cent over the year.

The figures for business investment spending overall are even stronger, meaning spending in mining has been growing somewhat, not continuing to fall.

This doesn’t mean mining investment has hit bottom, however. Higher commodity prices are prompting some minor investment, but there’s a last minus yet to come from the completion of some big gas projects.

The other really bright spot is strong public sector investment in infrastructure – mainly road and rail projects in NSW and Victoria – which grew by 12.2 per cent over the year to September.

The external sector made no net contribution to growth, despite the volume of exports – minerals, rural, education and tourism – growing by 1.9 per cent in the quarter and by 6.4 per cent over the year.

That’s because of a bounce-back in the volume of imports. Why, when consumer spending is weak? Because most investment equipment is imported.

If all these ups and downs are too equivocal to convince you the economy really is gathering strength, I have the killer argument: jobs growth.

As Morrison was proud to boast – apparently, all the new jobs are directly attributable to the government’s own plan for Jobson Grothe??? – the increase in employment during the quarter was remarkable.

It rose by more than 90,000, with eight in 10 of those jobs full-time. Over the year to September, total employment rose by 335,000, an amazing increase of 2.8 per cent.

It’s true the economy won’t be back to its normal healthy self until wages are growing a bit faster than prices, reflecting the improvement in the productivity of labour (running at 1 per cent a year).

But an economy with such strong and sustained growth in full-time jobs simply can’t be seen as sickly. And precedent tells us that where employment goes, wages follow.

Ross Gittins is the Herald’s economics editor.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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